Declassified Documents Reflect the Covert Side of Lunar Programs

… Declassified Documents Reflect the Covert Side of Lunar Programs – Published on Global Research.ca (first on National Security Archive, Electronic Briefing Book No. 479), by Jeffrey T. Richelson, July 21, 2014.

… Forty-five years ago, astronaut Neil Armstrong took his “one small step” for mankind, becoming the first person to set foot on the moon. The program that resulted in that historic event — managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) — had been a very public one ever since its announcement by President John F. Kennedy in 1961. Even the Soviet government had publicized aspects of its own effort.  

But there were also highly secret elements to the U.S. and Soviet schemes, which are the subject of today’s National Security Archive posting of previously classified records. The documents focus on three topics — early U.S. military plans, including the possibility of conducting nuclear tests in space, the use of the moon to reflect signals for military or intelligence purposes, and U.S. intelligence analyses and estimates of Soviet missions and their intentions to land a man on the lunar surface … //

… (full long text, Docs 1 to 16, notes).

Related Links:

Many more postings on The National Security Archive;

(The National Security Archive is an independent non-governmental research institute and library located at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The Archive collects and publishes declassified documents acquired through the Freedom of Information Act FOIA). A tax-exempt public charity, the Archive receives no U.S. government funding; its budget is supported by publication royalties and donations from foundations and individuals. On March 17, 2000, Long Island University named the National Security Archive as winner of a Special George Polk Award for 1999 for “piercing self-serving veils of government secrecy” and “serving as an essential journalistic resource.”
Address and Contact: National Security Archive (Homepage), Suite 701, Gelman Library, The George Washington University, 2130 H Street, NW, Washington, D.C., 20037, Phone: 202/994-7000, Fax: 202/994-7005, e-mail
).

Websites:

Find on en.wikipedia:

  • Information wants to be free is a slogan of technology activists invoked against limiting access to information. According to criticism of intellectual property rights, the system of governmental control of exclusivity is in conflict with the development of a public domain of information …;
  • Free content.

Comments are closed.